Captain Coghlan House

Building Location: 
408 Wood Street
Whitehorse, YT
Location Context: 

This house sits in a neighbourhood containing many heritage buildings. It is situated beside the Captain Campbell House, and is three doors down from the Ryder House. The Homer House sat to the west of the Captain Coghlan house until its demolition in 1994.

Description: 

1-1/2 Storey Log Building with Gable Roof

Architectural History: 

The building is a 1-1/2 storey log house with a gable roof sheathed with corrugated metal roofing. The front has a porch with a hip roof and the east facade has a frame shed dormer. The building is mounted on a log sill foundation. 

In 1924 a front porch was added to the house. The addition of shed dormer and rear rooms, likely built to accommodate a bath and kitchen, was completed in 1950.

Cultural History: 

Charlie Coghlan built this house himself around 1913, along with a similarly styled house one block up on Wood Street (see Chinery house). Coghlan was one of the famous stage drivers for the Royal Mail Service in its early days. In 1913, Coghlan was a shipmate, then master of several steamboats including the "Casca" on the Yukon River for the BYN Co. 

Dave Wilson owned and occupied the house between 1935-1950's. He worked as a purser for White Pass and as a pilot. He was manager of a White Pass construction company which was responsible for the construction of airports throughout the territory.

Biographical Information: 

Stephen Homer: ship carpenter 

Charlie Coghlan: shipmate and later master for the British Yukon Navigation Company on steamboats Casca, Canadian, Whitehorse, Klondike, and Klondike II. Prior to this, he worked as a stage driver for the Royal Mail Service. 

David D. Wilson: Originally from Vancouver, B.C., he purchased the house in 1938. Wilson worked as a deckboy and baggageman for White Pass, then as a steamship purser and pilot. In WW II, he headed a construction company for WP&YR which built landing strips and airports throughout the Yukon.